As a member organization of the Carlsbad Watershed Network, TECC works in collaboration with NGOs, agencies and jurisdictions to work for responsible watershed protection in the region.

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About The Watershed

The Escondido Creek watershed is formed by the creek of the same name. Beginning at the upper headwaters in Bear Valley above Lake Wohlford, the creek flows more than 26 miles to meet the ocean at San Elijo Lagoon. It’s over 75-square mile watershed includes lands managed by or governed by many jurisdictions, including:

  • The City of Escondido
  • The City of Encinitas
  • The City of San Marcos
  • The City of Solana Beach
  • The County of San Diego
  • Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management
  • The Soveign Nation of The San Pasqual Band of Kumeyaay Indians

Escondido Creek is the largest watershed in the Carlsbad Hydrologic Unit. As a member organization of the Carlsbad Watershed Network, TECC works in collaboration with NGOs, agencies and jurisdictions to work for responsible watershed protection in the region. Visit the extraordinary CWN website for detailed information including:

Photos of many reaches of the Escondido Creek Watershed

  • Maps of the hydrologic unit
  • Beneficial water uses within the Carlsbad Watershed

The Project Clean Water program oversees implementation of watershed management planning, educational initiatives, and legislative efforts benefitting the San Diego regional watersheds. Details of the Escondido Hydrologic Area (904.6) can be found on their website.

Much of the Escondido Creek Watershed possesses high-quality habitat, and is subject to the North County Multiple Species Conservation Plan (MSCP-N). Many of TECC’s land acquisition priorites fall with in the MSCP’s Pre-approved Mitigation Area designation (PAMA.)

Please visit our links page for more information about our partners and stakeholders.

“We call upon the waters that rim the earth, horizon to horizon, that flow in our rivers and streams, that fall upon our gardens and fields, and we ask that they teach us and show us the way.”

- Chinook Indian Blessing