The Escondido Creek Conservancy


San Diego County, California

Escondido Creek Conservancy News

The San Diego Urban Ant Project


By Matthew Leader, 11th Grade Biology Teacher, High Tech High North County For the past 100 years, San Diego has been faced with an invader that has changed ecosystems and pushed out many crucial native species. The Argentine ant is a species that thrives near humans in the ever-expanding development in Southern California. Widely seen as a nuisance, it also negatively impacts many native species across the county. For ...

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Natural Rodent Control


Last year a mountain lion was found dead in the mountains north of Los Angeles. While the reasons for the death are uncertain, signs point to the six compounds of a rodenticide discovered in his system. Despite its danger to wildlife, rat poisons and other rodenticides continue to be used to maintain rodent and pest populations. A recent study, however, could change public use of rat poisons as they ...

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Illegal Trail Restoration Update


Last month, an illegal trail was discovered that had cut through over a mile of essential wildlife habitat. One species that has been monitored here is the federally threatened California gnatcatcher. While the Conservancy allows recreation on certain areas of their reserves it's important for wildlife that people stay on designated trails; especially during nesting season. Thanks to some help from the San Diego Mountain Biking Association, ...

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New Hopes for a Plastic-Free Watershed


On a recent visit to the Escondido Creek, massive amounts of trash and plastic were found collecting at the end of the concrete channel draining into Elfin Forest. In the Escondido Creek watershed, water flows from Valley Center, through Escondido’s concrete channel, and drains into the ocean through San Elijo Lagoon. Plastic and trash flow along with the water causing problems for animals as they disturb riparian ...

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Creating Stewards through Education & Restoration


A conservancy's first priority is to preserve land.  Sometimes this entails maintaining natural habitats just as they are.  Other times, when the land is degraded, we have to restore it before we can preserve it.  But another key role of our Conservancy is to raise awareness so that the public understands why it's so important to protect land in the first place.  That's why we love restoration events with student helpers!  These events ...

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The Conservancy Fights Back Against Litter and Vandalism


Our tribute to a more beautiful Escondido has fallen victim to litter and vandalism in recent weeks. Plaza Del Arroyo is located in downtown Escondido, just across the way from Grape Day Park. This pocket park has been recognized by the Escondido Chamber of Commerce with the "The Jack Raymond Civic Engagement Leadership Award" and was recently transformed to include an urban butterfly garden thanks to a grant ...

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Illegal Trail Cuts Through Gnatcatcher Habitat


On January 22nd, our Land Conservation Manager, Hannah Walchak, made an unsettling discovery during a regular site visit on one of our north county reserves. An illegal trail had been created through over a mile of essential wildlife habitat. This reserve is home to a diverse group of plant communities including, oak woodlands, southern mixed chaparral, and coastal sage scrub. Many different species of wildlife thrive in this ...

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Can a first grader make a difference?


Can a first grader make a difference in our environment? That was the question that San Marcos Elementary North County first graders investigated under the direction of science teacher Shelley Glenn Lee as part of the Conservancy's Project Based Learning Program. Several years ago, after completing an inquiry-based study, they concluded that providing safer homes for nesting birds would help protect our bird population. With the help of High Tech High ninth graders and Conservancy ...

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